Returned 11-20 of 59 results

Q

Is there a course with the Royal Marines Band Service to see if I like it before I apply?

A

Yes. We run four-day ‘acquaint’ courses in the Portsmouth area, which will give you a taste of life in the Royal Marines Band Service, as well as a chance to ask questions and find out more about the different options available to you. It’s free and we’ll even pay for your travel costs.

Q

How long can you stay underwater in a submarine?

A

Nuclear Submarines are able to produce their own indefinite supply of air, water and power for driving the submarine forward. It's only limitation for staying submerged is the amount of food on board, or if they sustain a major defect.

Q

How do submarines dive and surface?

A

To dive or submerge the submarine, valves on the top of the very large ballast tanks are opened.

This allows the air in the tanks to escape; at the bottom of the tanks are holes that allow the seawater to flood in.

As water is heavier than air, the submarine becomes heavier and therefore sinks in a controlled manner.

To surface the submarine, the valves on the top of the ballast tanks are shut, high-pressure air is pumped into the tanks and the water is forced out through the holes at the bottom. The tanks fill with air and "float" the submarine to the surface.

Q

How safe are Nuclear reactors on board submarines?

A

Safety is a submarine's top priority. The submarine is designed and operated to ensure that the crew, the public, and the environment are protected from the risks of radiation.

The ship is designed with "shielding" around the reactor to reduce radiation levels. Radiation levels are very low, so much so that a submariner gets less radiation at sea than a person on a beach receiving radiation from the sun and other natural source

Q

How deep can a submarine go?

A

Submarines can dive to depths in excess of 250 metres.

The actual depth is classified.

Q

Can I visit a submarine?

A

Yes at the Royal Navy Submarine Museum in Gosport they have an actual submarine that is permanently open to the public. Their website can be found at the link below.

WWW.Submarine-Museum.co.uk

Q

I already have Naval Service experience so what training will I be doing with the Royal Naval Reserves?

A

This very much depends on whether or not you were classed as ‘trained strength’ in the Royal Navy, and which RNR job is assigned to you. You’re not expected to attend New Entry training – you are more likely to undertake your branch training at weekends instead. But you will still be expected to play an active part in your local unit.

Q

I am in full-time education am I liable to be called-out with the Royal Naval Reserves?

A

No. People in fulltime education are not called for mobilised service.

Q

If I find I can no longer make the commitment to the Royal Naval Reserves how much notice must I give?

A

We recognise that personal circumstances can change so if you feel you have to leave the RNR you are required to give a month’s notice, in writing.

Q

If I am mobilised with the Royal Naval Reserves, do I have to go?

A

Occasionally a call-out notice could prove very difficult at work or at home so there is a procedure for you, or your employer, to appeal against mobilisation.

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